5 reasons Yukon’s Tombstone Territorial Park should be your next adventure

Tombstone Territorial Park

Tombstone Territorial Park

5 reasons Yukon’s Tombstone Territorial Park should be your next adventure

One look at #TombstoneTerritorialPark on Instagram is enough to compel any Aussie outdoor adventurist to book flights to Canada’s Yukon Territory to witness the colourful subarctic landscape for themselves.

With its dramatic wind-carved mountains, including the craggy granite peak of Tombstone Mountain, alpine lakes and dazzling tundra, it is often referred to as the ‘Patagonia of the North’. Read on for five reasons why Tombstone Territorial Park should be your next bucket-list adventure.

1. It offers authentic indigenous experiences
Tombstone Territorial Park is a legacy of the Tr’ondëk Hwëch’in land claim agreement and lies entirely within their traditional territory. Drop in to the Tombstone Interpretive Centre, 1.5 hours north of Dawson City, to hear the stories of the First Nations people over a cup of ‘Mountain Wild’ tea by a crackling fire,

Lose yourself in the library and informative displays, and immerse yourself in the fascinating culture with an interpretive tour by one of the friendly guides. The Interpretive Centre has everything you need to plan your backcountry adventure, from trail maps to camping permits, and even a safety training session for serious hikers and those planning a multi-day hike.

2. Its backcountry hiking is second to none
With the Dempster Highway running through Tombstone, it’s one of the easiest places to hike in Yukon, with wildlife viewing and tundra walks accessible to even the most novice explorer.

Grizzly Ridge is one of the most popular trails in Tombstone Territorial Park, offering spectacular views of breathtaking rocky peaks and the vast Grizzly Valley. Make it a day trip or hike on through the alpine meadows of Glissade Pass to Divide Lake where you can set up camp below the imposing face of Mount Monolith.

3. The birds-eye-view is to fly for
The vast north Yukon region is so remote that a flightseeing tour is the only way to see it all. Take to the skies for a whole new perspective on this natural masterpiece, with lichen and wildflowers flooding the landscape with colour, as Mount Monolith rises dramatically out of the tundra. From late August to early September, the summery green hills transform to an autumnal splendour of bright red and gold.

Witnessing the majesty of the Tombstones during a flightseeing tour is a powerful reminder of the ancient, awesome nature of this remarkable part of the Earth.

4. Winter is seriously fun
Snowshoeing Tombstone’s tranquil trails is an unforgettable winter wonderland experience, perfect for all ages and abilities, and the perfect day trip from Dawson City, just 56 kilometres away.

Keep the camera on hand for roaming wildlife, such as moose, caribou, mountain goats, and (if you’re lucky) the gleaming white arctic fox and stay at a cabin or lodge for a front row seat to the dancing northern lights after sunset.

5. It’s sheer birding brilliance
Tombstone is a birder’s paradise, with over 150 species inhabiting the mountains. Birders can expect to see magnificent bald eagles, white-tailed ptarmigans, plovers, and loons, to name a few, and the Tombstone Interpretive Centre offering popular birding programs during the summer months.

Getting to Tombstone Territorial Park 
The drive from Whitehorse to Dawson City is 7 hours, or an hour by air with Air North providing direct flights.  Tombstone Territorial Park is 90 minutes by road from Dawson City.

Getting to the Tombstone Interpretive Centre
From downtown Dawson, take the North Klondike Highway for approximately 40 minutes.  Turn left onto the unpaved Dempster Highway and continue your drive for another hour, until you reach the Tombstone Interpretive Centre (located on the left).

Getting to Yukon Territory
Air Canada has daily direct flights to Vancouver from Sydney and Brisbane, with connecting flights to Whitehorse available on Air Canada and Air North.

For more information about Yukon visit www.travelyukon.com

Source = Yukon Territory
Pin It

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>